Dr. Gerry Rosenquist
Search Books

Dr. Gerry Rosenquist

“I also remember when the birth control pill came into general use. 1967. It made a huge difference in many people's lives, especially the poor. Women, finally were able to control childbearing on their own, and thus controlled their destiny.”

Occupation: Retired Chief of Staff at Winchester District Memorial Hospital
Dr. Rosenquist has 55 years of service in medicine!

Personal and Professional Experiences
  • he is a graduate of the University of Alberta and began his medical practice in Ontario in 1960
  • He established family practice and founded the St. Lawrence Medical Clinic in 1960
  • From 1975-2003 Dr. Rosenquist was Chief of Obstetrics at Winchester District Memorial Hospital
  • From 2003-2006 he was the Chief of Staff at Winchester District Memorial hospital.
  • He was also a lecturer at the University of Ottawa in the Faculty of Medicine.
  • Dr. Rosenquist is a highly respected community member, he is admired and respected by all who have ever had the privilege of meeting or working with him.
  • “Gerry Rosenquist is remarkable. What can you say? He’s the bionic man! No wrinkles, new eyes, new knees. He’s got it all!”
  • Served as Director and Treasurer at Upper Canada Playhouse
  • He was also a member of the Board of Directors at Naomi House (home for battered women).
“Gerry Rosenquist’s work accomplishments are staggering. He delivered more than 3500 babies, probably many of you reading this right now, did "call 24/7" for many years, attempted a jump over the St. Lawrence River according to some friends, worked long, hard hours without complaint, sunk Joan Christenson’s boat according to some other friends, was politically active in the community and beyond, enjoyed Remi Martin according to the last group of friends, played a role in many local spheres, of which the church and the playhouse are but two examples. And he might just be a tad opinionated . . . or at least as much as some of these claims are humorous!”
What does it mean to start practice medicine 55 years ago?

I started in 1960. The Salk vaccine(a shot) came out in the mid 50s. By the time I started practicing, acute polio was wiped out in Canada.I never saw a case of acute polio, but they had about 11 in Hull in the sixties from a faulty vaccine.

Antibiotics were just coming in to common use but penicillin still had to be injected so sulfa drugs and oral antibiotics gradually replaced it. Chloramphenicol was a great drug but it tended to produce agranulocytosis which was potentially fatal. It is not used today except in exceptional cases. Tetracycline replaced it and is still used today (as is penicillin) but more and more bacteria are developing resistance to both. Incidentally Gonorrhea and Syphilis were pretty well wiped out by the end of the 60s. I've seen chronic Syphilis, but never an acute case. It is making a bit of a come back now because of more widespread sex with multiple partners and antibiotic resistance.

I certainly do remember Thalidomide but never had any patients with side effects from it. I prescribed it for only a few months as the Germans were leery of usingit for morning sickness, as were the Americans. Interestingly Lois was pregnant with Mary-Jo at the time and I think she took 2 or three pills.

I also remember when the birth control pill came into general use. 1967. It made a huge difference in many people's lives, especially the poor. Women, finally were able to control childbearing on their own, and thus controlled their destiny.