Adrian Harewood
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Adrian Harewood

“Get out of your comfort zone, whatever that zone is.”

Occupation: CBC Radio and TV host, Ottawa

Personal Life
  • Harewood was born in Ottawa and attended Ashbury College for elementary and secondary school, where he was the head boy in his final year
  • His family is of Caribbean descent, and he has four younger sisters
  • He moved to Montreal where he earned a degree in Political Science from McGill University
  • After earning his degree, Harewood became a programmer and station manager for CKUT-FM (McGill University), where he also hosted a weekly program, Soul Perspective, about Black Canadian issues
  • He is active member of the community, and being involved is one of his biggest interests
Personal and Professional Experiences
  • Adrian Harewood is the co-host of CBC News Ottawa (he is the first non-white CBC Ottawa permanent host!)
  • Before he began in television, Adrian Harewood was the host of All In a Day on CBC Radio One in Ottawa, and previously worked as a substitute host on CBLA-FM in Toronto
  • “With radio”, he says, “you are in a dialogue; you speak directly to each listener. The difference on television is that you are more scrutinized and you realize that your body language really plays a role in how you communicate the message.
  • For example, when he first started on CBC News, his wife noticed a frequent shoulder movement and told him to limit it. The next day, a producer, having noticed the change in shoulder movement, remarked that he seemed too stiff. Anchoring, he smiles, is not easy. Aside from having to be more self conscious as one is conveying the information, the dynamic between television and radio is also different.
  • On All in a Day, Adrian was required to do nine interviews per show whereas on CBC News, he hardly does any interviews. However, the reduced workload is a welcomed challenge. Hosting CBC Ottawa News at 5, 5:30, 6 and 10:55 pm, means his schedule begins at around 2:30 pm and ends at around 11:15 pm which gives him more time to participate in the community, visit schools, conduct talks, and write.
  • Harewood has advice for young journalists who would like to be where he is today.

“Follow your passion,” Harewood says. “Be curious. Read widely. Be a sponge. Travel as much you can. Get out of your comfort zone, whatever that zone is. Learn some languages. Expose yourself to as many stories as you can be they radio documentaries or films or TV shows or ballads or magazine articles. Read poetry. Practice reading out loud. Check out some art. Ground yourself as much as you can in history and politics and philosophy and science. Don’t get complacent. Never be satisfied with what you think you know. Get to know your community. Get involved in community media (I am particularly biased towards community radio). Write something every day. Try to become as versatile as you can as a media practitioner.”